PAGE 1 VERO BEACH MAGAZINE

THE IRONMAN COMETH

BY TERESA LEE RUSHWORTH

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JON PINE

No, James Liccione does not engage in marathon

running, cycling and swimming, but when it

comes to manipulating iron to create fascinate-

ing objects, he does indeed seem to possess super powers.

Liccione is a local metal sculptor with a background span-

ning from New York City to Milan.

Many Vero Beach residents have seen his work and may

not even realize it. If you have ever admired the grand 11-

foot-tall gates that adorn the west side of the Vero Beach

Museum of Art, adjacent to the caf, then you have been

touched by Liccione's work. While fulfilling the museum's

desire for a traditional European look, the gates stand as

a memorial to Liccione's father and hero, who helped his

son design them while fighting cancer and passed away two

weeks before their completion in early 2000. So intense is

Liccione's respect for his father that he requested the gates'

dedication in lieu of payment for the project.

The senior Liccione, a second-generation Italian-Ameri-

can, was something of a Renaissance man and a great

inspiration to his family. He was a bona fide war hero,

having been decorated with a Purple Heart for his World

War II service in the Aleutian Islands, but he was also a

sensitive and creative man. Liccione Jr. remembers his

dad performing frequent wood and stone work around

their Rochester, N.Y., home. "I feel that a creative person

doesn't necessarily have to make something that is put on

a pedestal," Liccione says.

This creativity is a family trait. Another of the nine

Liccione children has found success in the art world-Alex

is an accomplished New York painter who has created,

among other works, an entire series of watercolors and oil

paintings based on WWII photographs, especially those of

his father's experiences in the Aleutians. "I look up to Alex

not just because he's my brother, but because he's a great

painter," James Liccione says.

Like Alex, James showed his artistic talent at an early

age. In high school he won the Hallmark Award, which

won him a scholarship to attend the Art Students' League

in New York City. A supportive family environment al-

lowed him to pursue his dream of an education and career

in art. "I was very blessed that God gave me two great

parents," he says.

Further scholarships sent him to the land of his chances

James Liccione's metallic art is on show everywhere, from the Museum of Art to Sesame Street.

THE IRONMAN COMETH

VERO BEACH MAGAZINE

JANUARY 2007

180

Standing over six feet tall, Grandfather Timepiece is true to Liccione's dual

commitment to beauty and functionality; it is a working, battery-operated

clock constructed of forged, twisted iron and carved, gilded wood. Created

in the mid-'90s, it is currently in the hands of a New York collector.

 He studied sculpture at the Academia Di Bella in Milan. In a peculiar turn of events, it

turned out that an obscure law on Italy's books at that time

allowed for him to be conscripted into the Italian army,

since both his mother and his paternal grandparents were

THE IRONMAN COMETH BY TERESA LEE RUSHWORTH

VERO BEACH MAGAZINE    PAGE 1

 

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THE

IRONMAN

 COMETH

BY TERESA LEE RUSHWORTH

VERO BEACH MAGAZINE

 

THE

IRONMAN

 COMETH

VERO BEACH MAGAZINE

JANUARY 2007

PAGE 1

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ORIGINAL ART FURNITURE! Art Furniture is one-of-a-kind sculptural art furniture for the original. The art furniture - iron gates, tables, sofas, clocks, chairs, beds, plus figurative sculpture function powerfully indoors or outdoors. Expert conservation and restoration!